Irony is a state of affairs or an event that seems disturbingly contrary to what one expects.  Legal malpractice concerns the effects of human error in the litigation of client’s cases.  It is highly ironic when mistakes are made in the litigation of legal malpractice cases.  Here is one example.

Yuan v Kaplan  2015 NY Slip Op 04637  Decided on June 3, 2015  Appellate Division, Second Department is a short opinion.  It is devastatingly forthright.

” In an action to recover damages for legal malpractice and breach of fiduciary duty, the plaintiff appeals from an order of the Supreme Court, Queens County (Brathwaite Nelson, J.), dated March 21, 2013, which granted the defendants’ unopposed motion pursuant to CPLR 3211(a)(7) to dismiss the complaint for failure to state a cause of action.

ORDERED that the appeal is dismissed, with costs.

The plaintiff did not submit papers to the Supreme Court in opposition to the defendants’ motion pursuant to CPLR 3211(a)(7) to dismiss the complaint for failure to state a cause of action, and the motion was granted on default. No appeal lies from an order or judgment granted upon the default of the appealing party (see CPLR 5511; Reynolds v Haiduk, 120 AD3d 656; HCA Equip. Fin., LLC v Mastrantone, 118 AD3d 850; J.F.J. Fuel, Inc. v Tran Camp Contr. Corp., 105 AD3d 908). Since the order appealed from was entered upon the plaintiff’s default in opposing the motion, the appeal must be dismissed (see Lumbermen’s Mut. Cas. Co. v Fireman’s Fund Am. Ins. Co., 117 AD2d 588).”