The situation is not unusual.  Attorneys represent client in a transnational setting, and the transaction is compromised, but not yet finished.  Three years are about to pass.  What is the plaintiff to do?  If you do not sue, the statute will pass.  if you do sue, defendant will say that it is too early.  Economic

With a serious injury, and with the best of intentions, Plaintiff hires a well regarded law firm to obtain compensation.  The law firm sues an incorrect governmental entity, in this case the City of New York rather than the U.S.  Is this legal malpractice?  To answer this question we revert to the four elements of

Real estate is a recurrent theme in the NY legal malpractice world.  In a way it’s location, location, location.  Real estate transactions  comprise big money in New York, big money involves attorneys, and where there is attorney activity, there is someone who loses in the transaction.  Where there is a lose in a transaction, there

You have the legal malpractice attorney defendant in a deposition.  Are you permitted to ask questions ?  Of course.  Are they limited to factual questions such as “when were you retained?” or “on what day did you file the motion?”  Surprisingly, no.  Longstanding case law allows the defendant attorney to be questioned as an expert

New questions, including those that might have seemed naïve in the past are being asked.  How will the pandemic affect representation of injured clients?  How will attorneys go about their daily tasks?  Will there be new classes of legal malpractice claims as clients suffer negative outcomes?  Will force majeure be applied to claims against attorneys