Pro-se cases, as might be expected, often wash up on the rocks because of poor technical application.  In Strujan v Kaufman & Kahn, LLP  2019 NY Slip Op 00630 [168 AD3d 1114]
January 30, 2019  Appellate Division, Second Department we see failed service of the summons, denied default motions and a direction that all motions be made by order to show cause.  Worse for plaintiff, dismissal.

“Since the defendants represented the plaintiff’s adversaries in a prior action, the causes of action alleging legal malpractice and negligence are unsupported by any duty running from the defendants to the plaintiff (see Betz v Blatt, 160 AD3d 696, 698 [2018]; Betz v Blatt, 116 AD3d 813, 815 [2014]; Gorbatov v Tsirelman, 155 AD3d 836, 840 [2017]; DeMartino v Golden, 150 AD3d 1200, 1201 [2017]; Pasternack v Laboratory Corp. of Am. Holdings, 27 NY3d 817, 825 [2016]).

The plaintiff’s allegations of “intentional harm,” which the Supreme Court properly interpreted as stating a cause of action alleging prima facie tort, were unsupported by facts demonstrating that the defendants acted with “malicious intent or disinterested malevolence” in the prior action (Ahmed Elkoulily, M.D., P.C. v New York State Catholic Healthplan, Inc., 153 AD3d 768, 772 [2017]; see Dorce v Gluck, 140 AD3d 1111, 1112 [2016]; Wiggins & Kopko, LLP v Masson, 116 AD3d 1130, 1131 [2014]; Smallwood v Lupoli, 107 AD3d 782, 785 [2013]; Lisi v Kanca, 105 AD3d 714 [2013]; Shields v Carbone, 78 AD3d 1440, 1442-1443 [2010]). Likewise, the allegations of defamation failed to state a cause of action. The law provides absolute immunity from liability for defamation based on oral or written statements made by attorneys in connection with a proceeding before a court “ ’when such words and writings are material and pertinent to the questions involved’ ” (Front, Inc. v Khalil, 24 NY3d 713, 718 [2015], quoting Youmans v Smith, 153 NY 214, 219 [1897]; see Weinstock v Sanders, 144 AD3d 1019, 1020 [2016]; see also Stega v New York Downtown Hosp., 31 NY3d 661 [2018]).

The plaintiff’s remaining causes of action are not recognized in New York or are inadequately pleaded (see Chanko v American Broadcasting Cos. Inc., 27 NY3d 46, 56 [2016]; Scialdone v Stepping Stones Assoc., L.P., 148 AD3d 953, 954-955 [2017]; Klein v Metropolitan Child Servs., Inc., 100 AD3d 708, 711 [2012]; 42 USC § 1983; CPLR art 14-A).”